Active Health Assessments

Due to the amount of time that people spend working nowadays and the sedentary nature of office jobs, it is becoming increasingly important for people to fit some form of activity into their working day. This in turn has been shown to boost both productivity and creativity. A quick way to see how your workplace measures up is to conduct health assessments of your staff. This is a great way for your staff to get a snapshot of their own health and for you to see just how healthy your workplace is.

Active Health Promotion offers a range of onsite employee health assessments that can be tailored to your needs. Health assessments can include:

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Blood pressure is the amount of blood in the arteries as the heart pumps it around the body.

Blood pressure is recorded as two numbers, for example 120 over 80 (120/80). The higher number indicates the pressure in the arteries as the heart squeezes blood out during each beat. This is called the systolic blood pressure. The lower number indicates the pressure as the heart relaxes before the next beat. This is called the diastolic blood pressure.

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Cholesterol is an essential type of fat which is found in the blood.

Cholesterol is necessary for normal cell functioning, hormone development and other bodily functions. The body generally produces sufficient amounts naturally to satisfy our needs. However, eating foods high in saturated fats can cause cholesterol levels to rise. This can lead to coronary heart disease- a major killer in Australia. Other factors which may cause high cholesterol levels are lifestyle factors such as lack of exercise, or a person’s genetic make-up.

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Diabetes is a chronic condition.

For our bodies to work properly we need to convert glucose (sugar) from food into energy. A hormone called insulin is essential for the conversion of glucose into energy. In people with diabetes insulin is no longer produced or not produced in sufficient amounts by the body. When people with diabetes eat glucose, instead of being turned into energy the glucose stays in the blood. This is why blood glucose is higher in people with diabetes.

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Heart rate refers to the number of times your heart beats in one minute.

Your resting heart rate (your heart rate at rest) is a general indicator of your fitness level i.e. the more conditioned your body, the less effort and fewer beats per minute it takes for your heart to pump blood to your body. Your resting heart rate should be below 80 beats per minute as a general rule.

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Body composition refers to the amount of relative fat to muscle you have in your body.

This can be determined by a number of tests including; body fat percentage, body mass index, waist measurement. Reducing excess levels of body fat has shown to reduce the risk of certain conditions such as high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes and cancer.

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Body Mass Index (BMI) is the relationship between your height and weight.

It is widely used to find out if you’re a healthy weight for your height. A high BMI can increase the risk of some diseases, including cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, osteoarthritis and diabetes.

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No matter what your height or build, an increased waistline is a sign that you could be at risk of developing serious problems

These include chronic disease such as some cancers, heart disease and Type 2 diabetes.

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Your waist to hip ratio is a body fat distribution estimate.

Excessive fat around the waist is indicative of increased risk of developing health problems like heart disease and diabetes. No matter your build or height, an assessment of your risk can be completed by measuring your waist circumference compared to your hip circumference.

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Flexibility is a joint's ability to move freely in every direction.

Flexibility decreases with age which affects our range of motion and makes us prone to more injuries. One way to check the flexibility of our lower back and hamstrings is the Sit and Reach test. The hamstrings and lower back are very important to freedom of movement and general posture. It’s important to work to keep the muscles in these areas free and flexible.

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The lungs are one of the hardest working organs in the body.

They expand and contract up to 20 times a minute to supply oxygen to all of the body and expel carbon dioxide. A lung function test provides a quick and easy way of measuring lung capacity and how fast you can expel air. This helps to determine if the airways are narrowing or changing and can assist in the detection and management of conditions such as asthma.

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Cardiovascular fitness is your heart and lungs' ability to provide your muscles with oxygen-rich blood and for your muscles to make use of this blood efficiently.

The risk of cardiovascular diseases like stroke, diabetes and high blood pressure is decreased by improving cardiovascular fitness. Your cardiovascular fitness can be improved by activities that make use of large muscle groups in a united and vigorous manner.

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The strength test is a great indicator of strength in your upper body.

There is a significant correlation between grip strength measured by a dynamometer and general upper body strength. Upper body strength is extremely important for daily function.

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Excessive stress can be detrimental to health.

Stress on the body for an extended period of time can lead to chest pain, increased blood pressure, headaches, stomach problems and issues sleeping.

When all health assessments have been completed, we will talk through the results with each staff member on an individual basis, with all information remaining confidential between us and the individual. We will also provide a high level executive summary to management showing a snapshot of how healthy your workplace is. We will then work with you to design and implement an active and healthy workplace program; from providing lunchtime group fitness classes, to designing an individual customised training program, we are keen to work together with you to make your workplace healthier and more productive.

We have assessment packages already designed for convenience or we can tailor the packages to your requirements, for more information contact us at info@activehealthpromotion.com.au

Our clients / people we work with